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Lower Streamside

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Brian Howell related that “The electrician Edwin Harvey, who rewired the house shortly before his death in 1975, said that his grand-father helped build a number of the waterfalls below the big bridge, often with bits of the old house.” He also wrote that, after his parents moved to Lukesland in the 1930s, “One early task was to dig out the bathing pool area from what had been an island of nettles, make the pool and summer house and thatch it with heather (changed to shingles after the 1939-45 war).”

Since it was developed by the Victorians, this is the oldest section of streamscape, and the waterfalls are particularly attractive here. The split level of the stream on either side of the island allows the ingenious design of water supply to the bathing pool, which fills from one level and empties into the other. The cascade below the pool is always a delight to see, as the clear water curves down under the trees. There are also two stone-concrete arch bridges in this area. The higher was built in the 1930s, but the lower dates from only 1979 and was built using the same wooden form as all of the older ones.


The royal ferns are a feature around the stream, growing prolifically at Lukesland though rare in most areas. Bamboos are also characteristic in this part of the garden, and the huge horse chestnut towers above everything, itself a wonderful sight when it flowers in April.
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